Time to change, time to educate

Sitting at my computer this morning reading all the great blogs from the 6th Annual Diabetes Blog Week, I looked over to my ‘Teach Yourself Complete Spanish’ book, thinking it is so hard doing that by myself, I wish I had someone to help educate me with the Spanish language, Diabetes is no different, only its round the other way and I have some of the tools to help others.

I was once alone with T1D, it gets in your head and brings you to self proclaimed conclusions about your life living along side T1D and because there are no others around you telling Diabetic stories around the camp fire and singing kumbaya you sort of get in your own little world and establish your own rules about how life should be with T1D.

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Guess what?? There are around 382 million people in the world with Diabetes who would love to sit around the camp fire and sing songs of Diabetes, if we change the way we think about T1D life by talking and sharing with other T1Ds around the world (along side the trusty medical profession) our lives would be so much better!

A great example is what Karen Graffeo has done with this Annual Diabetes Blog, wow it is so good to read the stories of other Diabetics and how they handle their world, we need more of this for sure.

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If you haven’t guessed, today’s topic is ‘Change’ and speaking of change, I know there is one thing we need to change peoples education on and that is the difference between Type 1 Diabetes and Type 2 Diabetes because there is so many theories about how ancient medicine and herbal teas can cure me…nuh uh, I have Type 1 and unless you have a pancreatic defibrillator, your herbal tea wont work on me.

So here is a quick run down on the difference thanks to Diabetes Australia;

Type 1 (me!)

In type 1 diabetes the pancreas, a large gland behind the stomach, stops making insulin. Without insulin, the body’s cells cannot turn glucose (sugar), into energy. Without insulin the body burns its own fats as a substitute. Unless treated with daily injections of insulin, people with type 1 diabetes accumulate dangerous chemical substances in their blood from the burning of fat.

Type 2 (not me!)

In type 2 diabetes, the pancreas makes some insulin but it is not produced in the amount your body needs and it does not work effectively.

Type 2 diabetes results from a combination of genetic and environmental factors. Although there is a strong genetic predisposition, the risk is greatly increased when associated with lifestyle factors such as high blood pressure, overweight or obesity, insufficient physical activity, poor diet and the classic ‘apple shape’ body where extra weight is carried around the waist.

Type 2 diabetes can often initially be managed with healthy eating and regular physical activity. However, over time most people with type 2 diabetes will also need tablets and many will also need insulin.

I was very upset and angry when I heard of a young child who had died of ketoacidosis because the parents took them off insulin for 3 days along with cup therapy as the ‘ancient Chinese medicine’ practitioner told them it would cure his diabetes. (Read the article here)

So lets get together and educate the world! (man that’s sounds hippy!?)

Gotta go, Dex is calling me (for the uneducated: thats Dexcom Continuous Glucose Monitoring system)…thanks for reading!

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